All Downtown Wilmington visitors should make a date with the Riverwalk, a long wooden walkway that follows the borders of the Cape Fear River and which provides plenty of unparalleled vistas along the way. Cruising past a number of famed landmarks, including the USS North Carolina Battleship, the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge, and the heart of the waterfront downtown itself, the Riverwalk is the perfect combination of history, beauty, and culture, and is a welcome introduction to the renowned Port City.

The Riverwalk is open 24/7 and stretches for roughly 1 mile along the waterfront, although plans are in the works to extend it even further through the city. The wide boardwalk is lighted for after-hours strolls, and has a series of cozy benches and light landscaping for visitors who want to pause, linger, and admire the view. At any time, Riverwalk strollers can also easily hop off the wooden planks to pop into a waterfront restaurant or boutique, or can even take a side-trip to visit the USS Battleship, which is located just a shell’s throw away. Scenic throughout the year and a great spot for walkers, joggers, and everyday sightseers, the Wilmington Riverwalk is an iconic destination, and is a “must see” for any new Cape Fear visitor.

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Cape Fear Boating Guide

Cape Fear Boating Guide

One of the most popular pastimes in the Cape Fear region is boating, and for very good reason. Surrounded by water that can range from the Cape Fear River itself to a network of salty canals and inlets that connect with the Atlantic Ocean, there are literally hundreds of miles to explore in this divinely coastal region. Enjoy a long and scenic trek down the Intracoastal Waterway, or just enjoy a cruise or tour of the downtown Wilmington waterfront. No matter how you prefer to explore, the Cape Fear boating scene is always beautiful, diverse, and ideal for an open water ride.

The Common at Cape Fear Station

The Common at Cape Fear Station

The "Cape Fear Station" community is a collection of homes and estates with a variety of settings from oceanfront locations tucked behind the sand dunes to wooded sites that are virtually hidden beneath the towering oaks of the maritime forest. All of these properties are interconnected via a series of sidewalks, which also run adjacent to and through the Cape Fear Station Common. The community, as well as the common itself, is named after the original lifesaving station which once stood along Bald Head Island's East Beach. The station is long gone, however the properties here have their own style and architectural attributes that make them fit in easily with the southern scene.